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Biden visits flood damage in Kentucky, pledges more government help 

At least 37 people have died from the devastating storm, which brought 8 to 10.5 inches of rain in only 48 hours to the region

Biden visits eastern Kentucky
Biden visits eastern Kentucky | @WhiteHouse

August 8, 2022 7:33pm

Updated: August 9, 2022 12:59pm

President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden visited on Monday the damage and destruction that resulted from the worst flooding in Kentucky’s history. 

At least 37 people have died from the devastating storm, which brought 8 to 10.5 inches of rain in only 48 hours to the region. Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear said that authorities are expecting the death count to rise as they continue to go survey the damage. 

Biden said the nation is obligated to help all of its people, saying that the federal government will help support the victims of the deluge until they are back on their feet. 

“We have the capacity to do this — it’s not like it’s beyond our control,” Biden said. “We’re staying until everybody’s back to where they were.”

After arriving in eastern Kentucky, the Bidens immediately drove to see the deadly damage that the storm caused, including a site where a school bus was carried by flood water and crashed into a collapsed building. 

Beshear said the flooding was “unlike anything we’ve ever seen.”

“I promise you, if it’s legal, we’ll do it,” said Biden, promising to bring aid to those in need. “And if it’s not legal, we’ll figure out how to change the law.”

Biden expanded federal assistance to Kentucky last week, ensuring that the government will cover the cost of the debris removal and other measures. 

According to White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has provided more than $3.1 million in relief funds and has deployed thousands of personnel to help. 

“The floods in Kentucky and extreme weather all around the country are yet another reminder of the intensifying and accelerating impacts of climate change and the urgent need to invest in making our communities more resilient to it,” she said.

As of Sunday, flooding remained a threat in the region, according to the National Weather Service. More thunderstorms are expected to hit Kentucky on Thursday.